Thursday, May 21, 2020

The Bhopal Disaster And Its Causes And Effects Essay

Now that we have an understanding of the Bhopal Disaster and its causes and effects, we can now try and understand the connection and importance that Indra Sinha’s Animal’s People has to the tragedy. In the first few pages of the novel, the narrator introduces himself stating, â€Å"I used to be human once. So I’m told. I don’t remember it myself, but people who knew me when I was small say I walked on two feet just like a human being,† (Sinha 1). As a reader, an introduction like this gets me curious to understand who or what the narrator really is or stands for. He had not even stated that he was an animal and as a reader, I inferred that it was a possibility. He goes on to state that this entire book is a record of his oral story on a set of cassette tapes. An Australian journalist named Phuoc and known as â€Å"Jarnalis† throughout the book had intentions of getting the victims stories out to the world, especially the story of this four -footed schizophrenic boy who went by the name â€Å"Animal†. Early on in the book, Animal argued why he did not want to tell the Jarnalis anything in the first place. â€Å"Somewhere a bad thing happens, tears like rain in the wind, and look, here you come, drawn by the smell of blood. You have turned us Khaufpuris into storytellers, but always of the same story. Ous raat, cette nuit, that night, always that fucking night† (Sinha 5). When Animal refers to that â€Å"fucking night† he is most likely talking about the Bhopal Disaster. In fact, Sinha’s bookShow MoreRelatedBhopal Disaster: Causes and Effects1075 Words   |  5 PagesBhopal Disaster: Causes and Effects By Daniel Olufemi December 2-3, 1984, the world witnessed an industrial catastrophe that claimed hundreds of thousand of lives, also living a huge army of victims with assortment of permanent disabilities. Newsmagazines, newspapers and newswires across the globe literally competed among themselves with screaming headlines to depict the disaster. The Time Magazine described it as The Night of death. The site of the incident was the pesticide plant ofRead MoreEssay about Bhopal Ethical Issues1307 Words   |  6 Pages1. Introduction: In the morning of December 3, 1984 a tragic event occurred in the city of Bhopal, the state of Madhya Pradesh, India. It has been known as the worlds worst industrial disaster. A Union Carbide India, Limited (UCIL)s plant released 40 tonnes of methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas which instantly killed over 3,000 people and carrying on causing the death of more than 20,000. This tragic event involved not only the technical, safety issues at the time, but also ethical issues on the responsibilityRead MoreBhopal Ethical Issues1350 Words   |  6 Pages1. Introduction: In the morning of December 3, 1984 a tragic event occurred in the city of Bhopal, the state of Madhya Pradesh, India. It has been known as the world s worst industrial disaster. A Union Carbide India, Limited (UCIL) s plant released 40 tonnes of methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas which instantly killed over 3,000 people and carrying on causing the death of more than 20,000. This tragic event involved not only the technical, safety issues at the time, but also ethical issues on the responsibilityRead MoreBhopal Gas Tragedy984 Words   |  4 PagesBhopal Gas Tragedy Product - Brand name Sevin (Union Carbide) - Third most used insecticide in US - Not fatal to people Carbaryl - Does not cause cancer Chemistry TLV = 0.02 ppm Methyl isocyanate Methyl Isocyanate (MIC) Clear, colourless, b.p. 39oC, odour threshold 2.1 ppm Effects of 0.4 ppm - Coughing - Chest pain - Breathing pain (dyspnea) - Asthma - Eye irritation - Nose, throat, skin damage Effects of 21 ppm - Lung oedema - Emphysema (damage of lung tissue) - hemorrhaging - bronchialRead MoreDisaster Is A Blind Killer1457 Words   |  6 PagesDisaster is a blind killer as it erupts and affects thousands worldwide. The severity of disasters is expected to increase as a result of contemporary threats (biological, cyber, nuclear, etc.) in addition to increased globalization and climate change. Yet sometimes government bodies, corporations, and the like fall short in instituting preventative systems to avert a disaster, oftentimes causing the general populous to be inadequately prepared should a catastrophe occur. Union Carbide’s gas leakRead MoreBhopal, Bhopal And Its Effects900 Words   |  4 PagesThirty years ago in Bhopal, India, an accident at the Union Carbide pesticide plant led to around thirty tons of highly toxic gases to fill the air and spread through the nearby towns. When the accident occurred, over 600,000 people were exposed to the very deadly gas. Over the past years, 15,000 people have been killed by the disaster and it’s effects. (Union Carbide Corporation, 2001-2014) Toxic material still remains in Bhopal to this day. (Taylor, 2014) This accident occurred in 1984 at theRead MorePreventive Measures And Preparedness Disaster Planning1576 Words   |  7 PagesSometimes government bodies, corporations, and the like fall short in instituting preventative systems to avert a disaster, oftentimes causing the general populous to be inadequately prepared should a catastrophe occur. This action is due to an overall shift in emphasis from preventative measures to preparedness in disaster planning. In â€Å"Generic Biothreat, or, How We Became Unprepared,† Andrew Lakoff articulates that today’s crises management involves the development of methods that could be usedRead MoreBhopal Gas Disaster Of 19841247 Words   |  5 PagesThe Bhopal Gas Disaster of 1984 INTRODUCTION On the Night of December 2, 1984, there was a horrific accident at the Union Carbide Pesticide Chemical Factory in Bhopal, India. The factory produced a chemical called methyl isocyanate (MIC) also know by Union Carbide as â€Å"Liquid Dynamite†. It is an organic compound with the molecular formula CH3NCO MIC is a highly reactive intermediate chemical used to manufacture various pesticides. This chemical reacts exothermically with water and produces a poisonousRead MoreThe Gas Leak Tragedy Of Bhopal1071 Words   |  5 PagesThe Gas Leak Tragedy of Bhopal, India is considered the worst industrial disaster in history. Originally, the Bhopal pesticide plants were to be some of the best and most beautiful plants which would have huge production capabilities. However, in 1984 there was a massive leak of methyl isocyanate (MIC) which spread out to local communities and has negatively affected the health of hundreds of thousands of people. The reason why the pesticide plant was created was for the â€Å"Green Revolution† in theRead MoreBhopal Gas Tragedy : A Terrible Gas Leak1642 Words   |  7 PagesSutton November 11, 2015 Bhopal Gas Tragedy A terrible gas leak on December 2nd and 3rd, 1984 had some of the worst impacts on the central part of India. It happened in the late night and early morning hours on those days when the clouds where filled with gray smoke which contained Methyl Isocyanate(MIC), one of the most poisonous gases from Union Carbide plant in the city of Bhopal. It was called one of the world’s most dangerous environmental disasters. The people of Bhopal had no idea what was coming

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

This paper scrutinizes the use of propaganda and the...

This paper scrutinizes the use of propaganda and the consequential effects during the Iraq War. It will look at certain specific events such as George W. Bush’s infamous â€Å"Mission Accomplished moment, as well as other incidents during the war that may have been a tactic to mislead the American public. This paper will also examine the censorship used by the main news media outlets as to how it affected the perspectives of the public. As one of the only means of getting information about a large war the United States was part of, these news outlets, in any type of media, whether it be newspaper or the television, could tell its audience anything, and they would have to accept it without doubt. By using these examples from the Iraq War the†¦show more content†¦It is vital to understand that the media did not necessarily fabricate the support for the war by the general American public, but it was never proven and there was a lot of doubt. The invasion of Iraq was a surprise military invasion without the official act of declaring war. This eventually led to an occupation and the taking of President Saddam Hussein. Saddam Hussein was tried by the new Iraq government and executed. From the start of the US occupation to years later, little had improved in Iraq despite media portrayals and in 2008 Iraq was number five on the Failed States Index. The 2003 Iraqi war symbolizes an international event that created a type of propaganda varying from the media broadcasted in previous wars. It also represents a defining moment in US history for its public relations campaigns. Even from the beginning of the war, the United States already labeled the event as â€Å"Operation Iraqi Freedom.† Other rationale for the invasion is still a majorly controversial issue. The United States’ official statement was to remove â€Å"a regime that developed and used weapons of mass destruction that harbored and supported terrorists, committed outrageous human rights abuses, and defied the just demands of the United Nations and the world† (Carlyle 2004). Both the United States and the United Kingdom stressed to their civilians that Saddam Hussein was developing weapons of massShow MoreRelated Paper761 Words   |  4 Pages In the 1790s members of the industry in both Paris and London were working on inventions to try to mechanise paper-making. In England John Dickenson produced the cylinder machine that was operational by 1809. Although useful for smaller enterprises, this lacked the large scale potential of the machine resulting from the invention of Nicholas-Louis Robert in Paris, which had a more complicated incubation period. The last of the early improvements to thi s machine were financed by the Fourdrinier brothersRead MoreReflection Paper836 Words   |  4 Pagesand integrating quotes. Before my papers were full of â€Å"she said† and â€Å"she would say†; which was boring and showed poor ability to lengthen my word choice. I also had a tendency to just throw quotes in and not integrate it into my writings. By the end of my English 101 class my papers began to present with words like â€Å"the author noted†, or â€Å"she stated† along with many other word choices and proper ways of using quotes. Here is an example from my final research paper: â€Å"Author Stephanie Jackson, a certifiedRead MoreOn Behalf of Paper1685 Words   |  7 PagesFor centuries, people have read and learned on paper. It has loyally served man as the ideal vehicle for conveying our thoughts, feelings, and ideas. In recent years, an opponent has risen: computers. The computer brought the world to our fingertips, to the palm of our hands, but is this competitor superior? Should we drop the written and printed empire that had dominated and quenched our thirst for knowledge for so long? Paper has served an ever-changing world well, constantly adapting and morphingRead MoreReflection Paper1317 Words   |  6 Pagesused to struggle with forming my thoughts into writing, let alone a paper. I was never confident with what I wrote. My writing had no greater purpose other than the assignment. My writing process included: writing my paper, proofreading it, and turning it in. Once the paper left my hands, it also left my mind. Throughout this course we worked with others, visited the writing lab, wrote critiques, and we were able to revise our papers. I believe that all of this is has caused me to grow greatly as aRead More History of Paper1180 Words   |  5 Pages The first historical mention of paper is 104 A.D. in China. The Empress of China at that time loved books and wanted to have a lot of them made. At the time everything was written on silk scrolls which were extremely expensive and time consuming to make. She wanted something cheaper and easier to use and so she asked one of her servants, a gentleman by the name of Tsi Lun to come up with an alternative. He worked for over nine years experimenting with different things and finally came up with hempRead MoreImportance Of Writing Paper870 Words   |  4 Pages Writing papers have not always been my favorite thing to do. The main reason why I detested writing papers, was because I considered my English horrible. English is not my native language and learning it was difficult i n my opinion. Especially, when as a child the only place where you could speak English was at school. Other than that, the only language I was allowed to speak at home was Spanish. Throughout the years I eventually got the hang of it, and at the beginning of fourth grade, I was placedRead MoreCharacteristics And Quality Of A Paper1062 Words   |  5 PagesChoosing the right paper is more complex and it requires more work than just picking any expensive sheet and keeping your fingers crossed. To choose the right paper, you should not choose one based on the highest quality available, or the most expensive one. Instead, you should choose your paper based on the paper size options, durability, finishing, color, the paper weight, price, availability, opacity, and brightness. To choose between the function and quality of a paper is not very easy. It isRead MoreSelf-Reflective Paper 838 Words   |  3 Pagesfixed. Although it was a process, I finally got around to clearly understanding what the objectives were for English 1302 and how to apply them to my papers for this course. The first objective that is given in the syllabus is to meet the requirement of 20 pages total by the end of the course. The objective includes being able to revise and edit papers in a proper fashion. There was a time where revising and editing did not seem important, however, it can make a significant difference in a grade.Read MoreRecycling Waste Paper11594 Words   |  47 PagesPaper recycling  is the process of recovering waste paper and remaking it into new paper products. There are three categories of paper that can be used as feedstocks for making recycled paper: mill broke, pre-consumer waste, and post-consumer waste.[1]  Mill broke  is paper trimmings and other paper scrap from the manufacture of paper, and is recycled internally in a  paper mill.  Pre-consumer waste  is material which left the paper mill but was discarded before it was ready for consumer use.  Post-consumer  wasteRead MoreCarabao Grass Paper17210 Words   |  69 PagesINTRODUCTION History Paper is believed to have originated in China sometime around A.D. 105. Its invention is credited to a Chinese artisan by the name of Tsai-Lun. Tsai Lun created the first type of paper by mixing macerated cellulose fiber with water. His method was simple. He beat rags to a pulp and diluted this with lots of water. He then drained the resultant mixture through a form of a sieve. The fibers matted together and, when it dried, formed what we know now as paper. This papermaking process

Demography and Stable Fertility Replacement Free Essays

A century is quite long; anything and many things could change in 100 years. Our world population and fertility rates for one thing. Currently developed countries either have a declining population or a mostly stable fertility replacement level. We will write a custom essay sample on Demography and Stable Fertility Replacement or any similar topic only for you Order Now However, most developing countries still have an ever-increasing population, which has quite a few negative effects on health, economy, etc. Will they stabilize in the next hundred years? I believe there is a huge possibility for them to indeed stabilize. With an ever-increasing global village, thanks to social networks, different people in different countries are becoming more and more like-minded. These developing countries have more access to the media and the over all mind sets of developed countries. I am originally from Arizona in the USA, but have been living in South Africa for the past 4 years. I can sense a dramatic change between the thought patterns among older generations of this country and those of the youth. Even those living in the impoverished townships have complete access to current Hollywood movies, Internet, and current music. This access allows all of them to speak English along with think with a more westernized mindset. Where the older generations want as many children as possible so that their children will take care of them in old age, and because of lobola (where a potential husband must pay his fiance’s parents roughly $5000 to marry her). But the youth nowadays want to get secondary educations, and want to have smaller healthy families, because they desire to be more like Americans. If such access is available in other developing countries I believe they will have a more stable fertility rate at some point in the next 100 years. These governments however will need to have active policies. It is no use knowing you need contraceptives, when you cannot get contraceptives. Without the support of governments and health facilities, woman and couples just may give up trying to plan their children. While keeping independence in tact, governments need to have simple policies that allow for choice. Basically just giving the availability of contraceptives, family planning, and health facilities (some forced things could be sexual education in school). Freedom of choice should not be taken from them; rather policies to increase their choices so they can better take control of their individual lives and that of their families or planned family. How to cite Demography and Stable Fertility Replacement, Papers Demography and Stable Fertility Replacement Free Essays A century is quite long; anything and many things could change in 100 years. Our world population and fertility rates for one thing. Currently developed countries either have a declining population or a mostly stable fertility replacement level. We will write a custom essay sample on Demography and Stable Fertility Replacement or any similar topic only for you Order Now However, most developing countries still have an ever-increasing population, which has quite a few negative effects on health, economy, etc. Will they stabilize in the next hundred years? I believe there is a huge possibility for them to indeed stabilize. With an ever-increasing global village, thanks to social networks, different people in different countries are becoming more and more like-minded. These developing countries have more access to the media and the over all mind sets of developed countries. I am originally from Arizona in the USA, but have been living in South Africa for the past 4 years. I can sense a dramatic change between the thought patterns among older generations of this country and those of the youth. Even those living in the impoverished townships have complete access to current Hollywood movies, Internet, and current music. This access allows all of them to speak English along with think with a more westernized mindset. Where the older generations want as many children as possible so that their children will take care of them in old age, and because of lobola (where a potential husband must pay his fiance’s parents roughly $5000 to marry her). But the youth nowadays want to get secondary educations, and want to have smaller healthy families, because they desire to be more like Americans. If such access is available in other developing countries I believe they will have a more stable fertility rate at some point in the next 100 years. These governments however will need to have active policies. It is no use knowing you need contraceptives, when you cannot get contraceptives. Without the support of governments and health facilities, woman and couples just may give up trying to plan their children. While keeping independence in tact, governments need to have simple policies that allow for choice. Basically just giving the availability of contraceptives, family planning, and health facilities (some forced things could be sexual education in school). Freedom of choice should not be taken from them; rather policies to increase their choices so they can better take control of their individual lives and that of their families or planned family. How to cite Demography and Stable Fertility Replacement, Essay examples

Sunday, April 26, 2020

Jazz Influences on the 20th Century free essay sample

The Influence of Jazz on Twentieth-Cantury Music Many people in today’s society don’t realize how much of an influence has been transpired throughout history overtime. We tend to overlook all the influences on today’s music and don’t actually appreciate history’s influences in our everyday lives. I would like to focus on the twentieth-century and how the visual arts influenced the time period. Hopefully this essay can spread knowledge and awareness on how much history has to do with influences in today’s music. In the 20th century, there were several American and European composers who were highly interested in the jazz industry. Composers have been using parts of native music for centuries. Some of the most popular names such as Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and   Bach, developed some of the most popular tunes of their time. In the earlier stages of the 20th century composers began to compose music that attempted to fuze together both Jazz and classical music. We will write a custom essay sample on Jazz Influences on the 20th Century or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Igor Stravinsky , Maurice Ravel, and Darius Milhaud were just a sum of the most notable. America had a few of its own successful composers as well such as, Aaron Copland ,George Gershwin , Gunther Schuller, and Leonard Bernstein also arrived through the inspiration of Jazz music. Most of the Jazz scene began to develop in New Orleans, other major cities such as St. Louis, Memphis, and Chicago had their own style. Once New Orleans was sold through the Louisiana Purchase, the city had a higher standard of living with their dancing, wine drinking, food and love for music. The overall background circulating around New Orleans was the gateway to the beginning of Jazz. They created music with unique sounds that offered the society a new perspective on music. Americas very own composer Gershwin, composed one of the worlds most pronounced pieces of jazz called Rhapsody in Blue. Another composer ,Aaron Copland, composed his own piano concerto that was Jazz-influenced. The song Prelude, Fugue and Riffs, composed by Leonard Bernstein is a song that sounds familiar to the works of Bach which also had combinations of Jazz. There was also an Austrian composer named Ernst Krenek who composed a well known Jazz-influenced opera called Jonny Spielt Auf. The song created a story base on an African-American Jazz musician making a living in Europe named Jonny. He was believed to have been involved with stealing a violin and connected to a secret plot . The end of the song has Jonny on the top of the globe on stage,celebrating the fact that Jazz has become the center of European music. These are just some examples of Jazz inspired musicians. When you look into the overall history of Jazz many people will come to find out that it is one of the first genres to adapt other genres. When Jazz began to evolve from ragtime to big band to bebop, fans of several types of music took notice. Artists such as Miles Davis, spent his career changing his sound and style ane became a model in the evolution of fusion, and jazz which drastically changed RB, Rock , Funk, and other types of music. Davis, Ray Charles , Herbie Hancock, and many other jazz musicians helped to start the trend of cross-compilations playing on albums of artists who are not jazz artists. These examples of musicians throughout history shows you that Jazz is far from expiration and it is constantly evolving through the centuries.

Thursday, March 19, 2020

5 Brilliant Motivation Tips to Help You Study - Proofread My Paper

5 Brilliant Motivation Tips to Help You Study - Proofread My Paper 5 Brilliant Motivation Tips to Help You Study If you’ve searched for motivation tips on our blog, we’re guessing that of all the things you want to be doing right now, working isn’t one of them. Maybe you’ve trawled the internet’s extensive archive of motivation-themed gifs already, only to find yourself stubbornly idle. Well if that’s the case, you’ve come to the right place. Below you’ll find five brilliant motivation tips to help you with your studies, so soon you’ll be working harder than a beaver in the busy season! 1.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Set Achievable Goals We all know the tyranny of the blank page. That little cursor blinking at you accusingly while you stare at a new document, not knowing how to start. And with longer papers, sometimes it seems like you’ll never be finished. It’s thus important to set achievable goals. When you start a new assignment, begin with something simple, like making a plan of what you’re going to do, compiling a list of sources or identifying your research questions. Likewise, when faced with a heavy workload, try to write a set number of words every day. You’ll be surprised how much progress you make! 2.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Reward Yourself If you’re setting achievable targets, you should also reward yourself when you hit them. This might be as simple as saving your night out until you’ve got an important piece of work done. But you can also treat yourself with bigger prizes for completing major assignments. 3.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Get Support No one can force you to feel motivated, but a little help can go a long way. If you’re struggling because you’re confused about something mentioned in class, for instance, try asking your professor for clarification. Similarly, if you find it hard to revise by yourself, start a study group with friends. 4.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Get Competitive! When we say competitive, we don’t mean bragging to the rest of your class about your test scores. Rather, you should think of each paper as a chance to improve on the last one. Aim for a new personal best each time! Alternatively, you and a friend could compete against each other to see who can do best on each assignment. Try to be a graceful winner though, otherwise you might not be friends much longer. 5.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Beware Bad Study Habits Finally, try to be aware of your own bad habits. This includes things like procrastination, low confidence and getting frustrated because your paper isn’t â€Å"perfect.† All of these will drain your motivation, so knowing how to spot them can help you stay on track.

Monday, March 2, 2020

18 Irresistible Types of Travel Writing - Freewrite Store

18 Irresistible Types of Travel Writing - Freewrite Store Photo by  Josh Nezon  on  Unsplash Today’s guest post is by  Corinne Lincoln-Pinheiro.   Corinne is a journalist with experience as a freelance legal digital reporter, military journalist, city junior newspaper editor and health blogger. She is a military spouse blogger and also writes about military-family travel.  Corinne is also a  published creative nonfiction writer and poet.    Finally, you’re ready to take the plunge into the travel writing sphere. Now what? What types of travel writing are right for you? Well, whether you’re a novice or seasoned writer searching for something new, there are multiple avenues from which to turn an aspiration into a part-time gig or full-time career. Modern travel writing appears in many forums, from travel blogs and websites, in-flight travel magazines, trade magazines, newspapers, free periodicals, books and more. But before all that comes the decision as to which one(s) suits you best. The Travel Writer’s Guide Of course, deciding on what’s a good fit depends on your interests and expertise. Because many travel writing categories overlap and have similar templates and requirements, you can do more than one type of writing simultaneously. You should ask yourself: how much time do I want to devote to research, how many articles can I produce a week, and how far am I willing to travel and how often? Am I drawn to travel journalism? Whether this venture is a stepping stone to something else, supplement income, or a new career altogether, travel writing is competitive and writers are typically poorly compensated. The best travel writers are unique and bring a fresh perspective. Being able to pitch great ideas, following through, and having something interesting to say is indispensable. Whatever you do, be authentic, candid, and creative in your approach. I once pitched a two-week travel extravaganza (from Forks, Washington State to Eugene, Oregon), and wrote more than 20 pieces about (sometimes little known) attractions along the West Coast. The travel series on gems near Highway 101, ran both online and in print.   Creativity is one thing but you must have your readers’ interest at heart. After an all-expenses-paid trip to the South, I didn’t give outstanding reviews to all of the attractions (unlike the travel bloggers in attendance). But my audience- primarily military families, often had to take vacations on a budget, if they took one at all, and they appreciated the advice about attractions that weren’t worth the price. This guide will provide a brief overview of 18 types of travel writing options to help you narrow down which one(s) you’d like to pursue. Types of Travel Writing: 1. Weekend Warrior2. Content and Social Media Marketing3. Roundups and "Best of" Lists4. Holidays and Special Events5. Side Trips6. Destination Pieces7. Travel and Lifestyle Blogging8. How-To Travel Guides9. Advice Articles10. Travel Itineraries11. Food and Travel12. Guidebooks13. Travel Humor14. Personal Travel Essays15. Travel Memoirs16. Travel Modes17. News Travel18. Travel Op-Eds 1. Weekend Warrior Are you one of those people who gravitate toward articles about the perfect day trip? Local or regional attractions are great for this type of piece. This is a mashup of a few ways to travel write- it can be an outdoor expedition, recreational indoor activity, weekend getaway, or a combination. It may focus on a fishing trip, bike or hiking trails, scenic road trips, or indoor rock climbing for example. It’s a destination piece with an element of adventure that gives the reader a glimpse of what they could be doing this weekend. Travel writers should know the market, the publication and their vocabulary. Consider if the piece will be family-oriented, what are some interesting things to do outside of the must-see attractions, how to get the most out of the day or weekend, along with descriptions of the scenery and facts about the activity. Whether it's water sports, glamping or packaged adventures, if you live it, why not write about it? This can also be a version of roundups (see below) and may include additional specifics on a destination’s happy-hours specials, shopping, food, drink, the arts, and nightlife. Photo by Corinne Lincoln-Pinheiro 2. Content and Social Media Marketing Travel companies sometimes hire freelance content and social media writers to promote their product and services via blog posts, video clips, and articles. You’ll need to write quickly, vary the tone for targeted audiences and engage with followers and update posts. If you favor succinct tweets, Instagram blasts and Facebook blurbs, you’ll like this option. Side note: As a travel writer, you should have a social media presence anyway. While you’re traveling, you can upload videos and pictures to promote the attractions and things to do at the destination. Also, during complimentary travel, businesses like the fact that you’re able to â€Å"bring along your followers to visit† their destinations and spread the word instantly. Finally, most companies have social media pages and as more people turn to them for ideas, travel content and social media writers are in demand, especially if you employ SEO practices. There are even content marketing companies that hire travel writers specifically to research and write content for other businesses. 3. Roundups and "Best of" Lists Very popular these days, roundups are bullet-point lists that collect information on different destinations with a common theme, like the â€Å"10 Best BB’s in San Francisco.† It isn’t too in-depth and because it’s brief, the catch is finding ways to spice up descriptions and avoid clichà ©s. The introductory paragraph setups the common thread/angle and bullet points justify why the destination made the list. Roundups should be accurate and well-researched to produce quality pieces (even better is visiting the destinations and providing original content). If your roundups are in the same region (like the BBs in San Francisco) before you visit you can request complimentary accommodations. Better yet, contact local tourism agencies and they’ll help set up tours, press passes, create your itinerary and provide tour guides, on occasion. Roundups get a lot of online views and are easily scan for pertinent information (it helps build your portfolio, too). 4. Holidays and Special Events A travel story  involving holidays and special events such as New Year’s or Germany’s Oktoberfest should be pitched and planned well in advance. If you’re new to travel writing, you can start with local festivals and fairs. One lesson I learned early on as a journalist who also covered travel writing- these events can produce multiple pieces and can be a treasure-trove for new leads. For example, the first piece can be a 200-word announcement of the event. Closer to the occasion, an interview with an event official about last year’s successes and what to expect this year serves as a reminder. As you cover the event, talk to everyone. If you do  multiple  types of travel  stories your next lead or resource could be around the corner. Photo by  Corinne Lincoln-Pinheiro 5. Side Trips A side trip is a â€Å"side-step† on the way to or from (or nearby) a major destination. It focuses on another city or lesser known location or attraction. Magazines usually plan for and arrange side trips to complement the issue’s featured travel article. Pitching these ideas early on can help them plan around the issue. Side pieces detail how to get there, attractions details such as hours of operation, so readers can know what to expect when visiting. Side trips are usually day-trips and travel writers maximize the benefits by also using these destinations (or information from them) in roundups or even weekend warrior angles.   6. Destinations Pieces Destination pieces that are feature articles are usually very in-depth. It finds the right angle to draw the reader into the painting the travel writer creates and entices them to visit. Features can be seasonal but should always be relevant. Often, editors assign these to established writers or those they have a working history and familiarity with. Well organized pieces seamlessly integrate facts, anecdotes, historical information, encounters, storylines, and the â€Å"Five W’s† of who, what, when, where, and why (and sometimes how). The challenge remains, as with all popular attractions, finding a fresh way to retell something many others have done before.   It’s usually told in the first person and the voice is more of a delivery tool than the focus. Great travel writers avoid meaningless descriptions and write compelling articles that make the reader hungry for the next detail. Destinations can also highlight overlooked attractions and little-known gems. 7. Travel and Lifestyle Blogging Travel blogging allows writers to set the tone and pace because there are no editors or deadlines or templates, just you and your readers. You can also be a guest contributor or invite guest bloggers to increase visibility. As for lifestyle blogging, it’s great for multiple ways of travel writing because you set the terms, here as well. However, it’s very competitive so the key is to build trust and rapport and be a credible resource for readers. You can write longform posts, roundups, destinations, weekend warriors angles and itineraries, you name it. Itineraries can take the form of where to eat, stay, and play, whereas longform posts are more narrative in nature with characters and vivid details. Bloggers keep the reader’s attention by being witty, creative and engaging, even intimate; they are active (in life and online), giving readers repeated reasons to return. 8. How-To Guides The how-to travel piece imparts invaluable advice and information, making travel writers a tour guide of sorts. You can help solve readers’ travel problems before they occur, and this alone will generate more shares if it's relatable and reliable. A how-to can focus on just one aspect of travel like how to get around complex international airports for example. â€Å"How-to† travel advice is a frequently googled topic, such as, â€Å"How to travel on a budget.† Travel writers should be comfortable conducting thorough research and have knowledge of the destination, where applicable. Great how-to articles are honest and trustworthy and teach readers essential tips beyond what the attraction entails. 9. Travel Advice Articles A how-to article can easily turn into an advice piece which discusses, for example, mishaps that can happen on a trip.   Advice on overcoming language barriers, what to do if you have to deal with law enforcement, foods to avoid, what to do if you lose your luggage, scams, where to get discounts and bargains, what to do if you miss your flight or if you become lost, all of these are advice a reader may not know they need. Whatever you recommend, it must be well-researched and interviews with credible experts help reinforce the advice given. Editors often assign these pieces to staff writers and not freelancers. How-to and advice travel articles can be in-depth standalone pieces, but often this information is incorporated in other pieces such as destination articles. Readers appreciate the one-stop â€Å"shopping,† especially if the advice is destination-specific and integral to the region. Many see this type of advice as essential to any travel piece. 10. Travel Itineraries Itineraries are city-by-city, region, destination, or sight-by-sight recount of all the details from planning to returning home, so the traveler can use it as a stencil. There are recommendations on where to visit and how to maximize time and save money. It goes into greater detail about the challenges of visiting a specific location, drive times and routes, weather and road conditions, crowds and busy times, and what clothing and gear to pack. Itineraries can be first-person accounts, relaying door-to-door experiences with a narrative thread that runs throughout. 11. Food and Travel This is a prized gig for foodies- exploring diverse cuisines, cultures, and dishes, all the while visiting interesting places. This is a staple in the travel writing industry because there are evergreen opportunities to explore. If you have a genuine interest in food and basic cooking knowledge, this dream job can lead to interesting discoveries, making for well-rounded pieces. Food and travel articles are not reviews and are more than just why a meal is great or where it falls short or the restaurant’s location. It’s the presentation, the ambiance, the way this dish makes you feel, the amazing hole-in-the-wall gems. You get to write about: how in some places food is passed on as an inheritance; how it can be the marking of a culture and its people; how it intersects with history and traditions and is a celebration of living.   Photo by  Corinne Lincoln-Pinheiro 12. Travel Guidebooks If you’re more of a straight-forward kind of writer, then this might be a better fit for you. Its factual, practical, and linear. It can be part-time or full-time employment but if constant travel isn’t appealing, you can be a local or regional writer.   Guidebooks cover a wide variety of subjects and are heavy on descriptions, and to stay current must have up-to-date listings. Many set boundaries and divide the guide into sights to see. Don’t rely on internet research alone, it’s best to see the place because knowledge of your destination is paramount, along with a good understanding of maps. Guidebooks may include quality beaches, five-diamond lodging and independent hotels, museums, history, architecture and local traditions. However, work can monotonous.   13. Travel Humor Do you have a knack for writing humorous stories? This can be a niche in and of itself in travel writing, and humor is sought after and well received by editors. It requires a clear voice, firsthand experiences, a storyline that engages, and sticking to an angle (and in a refreshing way). It builds rapport with readers, especially if the joke is at your expense. The downside is the risk of insulting someone, unintentionally singling out a group of people or being culturally insensitive, using offensive language, or accidentally letting your prejudices creep into your writing, or worse, using your wit as a weapon. Many travel writers stick to universal misadventures, misassumptions, misunderstandings, and tongue-in-cheek humor. But finding that delicate balance in tone, and keeping humor relevant, light-hearted enough, inclusive, and tolerant is no short order. 14. Personal Travel Essays A well-written, insightful personal travel essay is every editor’s dream, but it’s not always in demand or easy to write. A distinct voice, great backstory, a universal theme and/or lesson, the ability to tell a travel-related story imbued with metaphors and comparisons that reaches the reader, are all part of great travel personal essays. Switching between views- from wide to medium to close-level lenses, add depth, as well. Personal travel essays are more like a journey of discovery as the piece matures; its rich in perspective and a balanced travel narrative. The travel aspect shouldn’t hide inside your personal essay, your purpose should live amongst its storyline. Places can often invoke revelations that arise through reflection, writers learn about themselves, explore emotional issues, and make hidden connections. 15. Travel Memoirs Travel memoirs are even harder to write and many never make it to publication, especially if it reads like a diary entry. They aren’t autobiographical as traditional creative-nonfiction memoirs but like a personal essay, it has to be well-written, possesses a strong voice and point of view, something exceptional to say, even a metaphorical journey. Time and place, scenery, culture, and a distinctive narrative create a window into your experience. Knowing the targeted audience, developing fully-realized characters and storylines, and remaining focused (not every mishap should make it into your memoir), are the marking of a successful travel memoir. Finally, as with any book, know your publishing options, find an editor who is willing to work with you (even secure an agent), ask for help if you need it, walk away from time to time, and don’t doubt your abilities. Most of all start writing today, you have nothing to lose. At the very least it can be one or more exceptional personal travel essay. Or you can self-publish an eBook which you can use to market your writing skills. Photo by  Corinne Lincoln-Pinheiro 16. Travel Modes The travel modes  focus isn’t destinations but the form of transportation i.e. how you get there and the voyage itself. Transportation modes include vintage trains, railroads, ships, and automobiles. Not a how-to or advice piece, it can overlap in some ways but the central theme is the discoveries along the way, the way it makes the author feel, and other nostalgic and historical angles. Facts, a vivid narrative, (and photos even), elevate these expedition pieces.   17. News Travel Writing about places that made the new cycle either because of war, civil unrest or terrorism can become popular after the chaos is over. Places like Egypt and Israel, with its rich biblical history, monuments, and locations like Mt. Sinai and the Red Sea, are of interest to many a reader and traveler, alike.   This is a tricky mixture because though tourism is alive in these places, civil and economic disturbances (afterward) affect interest levels and thus publication opportunities. (Though there are readers who enjoy learning about such places, even if they have no intention of visiting.) Another intersection with travel writing and the news is if to travel to destinations that experience natural disasters. The occurrence of tsunamis, hurricanes, and earthquakes, can open the way for a how-to about keeping safe and what to do in case it happens while on vacation. Discounts, bargains and cheap travel packages to nearby locations (where tourism may also suffer) make for travel articles, as well.   18. Travel Op-Eds Op-ed pieces are not as commonplace as other travel writing mediums. However, these travel writers are intimately familiar with each publication’s tone, style, and platform, and check (and adhere to) submission details and deadlines. Again, being original and persuasive, having a clear decisive voice, something valuable to share, and an angle increases publication opportunities.    There you have it, 18 ways to get started as a travel writer. Do you have experience with travel writing? We'd love to hear your story in the comments!      Corinne has freelanced as a legal digital reporter for ICS and ten of their national publications. She has served as a military journalist, travel writer, and photographer for Swarner Publications and their newspapers on Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM), including The Ranger, the Northwest Veteran (NW), the Northwest Airlifter, and their two online magazines, JBLM Spouses and JBLM Singles. At Fort Hood, she  was a  reporter and health blogger for the Killeen Daily Herald and a  junior editor for its former local paper, the Copperas Cove Herald. As a former military spouse, she’s written for Military.com and its subsidiary site, SpouseBuzz. She has published essays and poems and has a Master’s degree in Creative Nonfiction from Vermont College of Fine Arts, and a Bachelor’s degree in English from Pacific Lutheran University.  Corinne also has a background in Human Resources.

Saturday, February 15, 2020

The seriousness of Military Veteran Homelessness Essay

The seriousness of Military Veteran Homelessness - Essay Example â€Å"Roughly  56 percent  of all homeless veterans are African American or Hispanic, despite only accounting for 12.8 percent and 15.4 percent of the U.S. population respectively† (National Coalition for Homeless Veternas, 2011). The biggest problem of the military veterans in America is homelessness. About 50% of the veterans that had served in the military in the Vietnam era are homeless today. According to the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), most of the homeless veterans of the nation are men while the percentage of women is about 5. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) records a minimum of 131000 homeless veterans every night while the number of military veterans that are found to experience homelessness every year is 262000 (National Coalition for the Homeless, 2009). They generally come from urban regions and account for one third of the total population of homeless people in America. The homelessness and lack of employment is just as much a problem for the young veterans who have recently returned from Afghanistan and Iraq as it is for the old veterans that have served in the previous wars. They have their lunches and dinners in the soup kitchens and are desperate for finding jobs even if they have too do menial works (USA Today, 2007). Last, but not the least, the homelessness has led the military veterans to depression. A vast majority of these veterans are single and suffer from physical and psychological illnesses. Many are patients of depression and are addicted to substance abuse. One veteran said, I shed blood for this country and got the Purple Heart after a mortar blast sent shrapnel into my face and leg. But when I came back home from Vietnam I was having problems. I tried to hurt my wife because she was Filipino. Every time I looked at her I thought I was in Vietnam again. So we broke up. (Glantz, 2009, p. 1). Unfortunately, there is no proper system in place to cater for